Reflections on the real

Changes to the edit

After seeing Anthony last week and getting some one on one feedback about my images and book layout. We discussed alot about ordering and what the current state of the book is like, talking about what is needed and what I am missing. As it is at the moment i’m not too fond of how it looks. It doesn’t appeal to me and I think its rather boring. I dont want it to be like this, I want to show simular sized images but better planned out working with each other, e.g double page spreads with a decent border around both images.

Here’s the sort of changes we talked about

1

Do I need the petrol station shot?

 

3

Find a better image to show the companionship between the drifters and where they work on their cars.

 

2

Take one image away, the siluette is alot better in my opinion. I’ve already repeated the blurring across the book with the number plates etc. It looses its impact the more its used. Make the darker portrait bigger too.

 

4

The books about street drifting, need more actual street drifting photographs.

 

5

Used too many of these images, take most/all of them away.

 

6

Get rid.

 

More updates to come.

Reflections On The Real

It’s been a few weeks since the start of the Third and final year of my degree and i’m certainly feeling the pressure, trying to manage my time between different projects and life duties is becoming harder. I’ve not really been putting a great amount of effort into thinking of project ideas and the ones I do come up with seem to be falling on their face. At first I wanted to photograph something wacky in the Gloucestershire county, there is alot of weird and wonderful things going on this winter, but none of which really engaged me fully. I was interested in going to one of the biggest Toy Collectors fair in the country in Birmingham, but it just didn’t feel like it had enough depth within the story. So yet again i’m left hunting for ideas.

Thats when I met two fellow motoring enthusiasts. For their protection I will not refer to them by their real names and I will blur out their number plates in every photograph both on this blog and in my final workbook. As what they get up to is still illegal at the end of the day. So for their protection I will not revel their identities. Instead I will call them codenames designated by the colour of their cars e.g Black and Blue. Blue and Black both own Nissan 200sx s13s which are cars of choice for drifters as their lightweight, rear wheels drive, turbo powered and easy to modify. They met as a result of their cars through forums specifically for drifters across the world. They told me that if it was not for their cars, the forum and instagram they probably wouldn’t be friends at all. They both work on their cars at Blues farm and go out at the middle of the night drifting in the quiet gloucestershire country roads. They’re not rebellious asbo thugs however, everything they do is organized, set up and well executed. For example, they bring their friend Red who also owns a Nissan 200sx S14 along, his job is to stand on the corner of this quiet road with a walkie talkie to both drivers telling them if the road ahead is clear. It is as safe and as controlled as it can be. The common misconception about drifters is that their loud thugs who are a menace to society. But in this case that just isnt true. Blue is an apprentice at a garage and Black is a student at university who both drive and build up their cars with whatever money they have just for the passion and love of the cars. They’re really nice guys, nothing thuggish about them, I respect that they use walkie talkies to let each other know if the coast is clear and i respect the manner in which they drift on the street. They find the quietest road, usually near a motorway to mask the noise of screeching tyres, surrounded by trees to also mask the sound of their exhausts and have people on look out with tow ropes and equipment if things happen to go wrong.

I want to try and get into their lives, with each other and with the cars. They tell me stories of all the things they’ve done to the cars, the amount of money they’ve put into them and the joy they get out of them all with a massive smile on their face. I want to get intimate photographs of what they do on the farm working on their cars, capture them street drifting and socialising. They say they meet up at least once a week to go drifting in their cars. In a sense I want to be accepted into their group but not as a member if it were, but as an observer. I am going to make a small photobook out of this which will be a clean format with fairly well sized images. As said before the faces and number plates are all going to be blured out to protect their identity. I feel as if this will add an element of drawing the viewer in, a mysteryousity of who these people are. The layout is going to be clean, concise and well thought out with quotes and captions of interviews with them.

Im exited to start shooting!